Subscribe to Infinity Learning Maps

Grow student agency! Develop personalised learning! Grow student’s confidence in learning how to learn! Subscribe to Infinity Learning Maps and have access to this innovative tool that looks at learning from a student’s perspective! The e-guide includes six interactive sections Overview, Genesis, Theory, Trends in Learning, Five Practical Steps and Research. Over 50 illustrated pages with embedded links to support videos, templates and frameworks.

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Annan, Lai, Robinson (2003) Teacher talk to improve teacher practices. NZCER: Set  2003, No 1.  

“Teachers engaging in “learning talk” analyse, critique and challenge their current teaching practices to find and/or create more effective ways of teaching. Using three New Zealand studies, this article examines the effectiveness of “learning talk” in facilitating changes in teacher practices and beliefs, and in student achievement. It addresses the challenges to this kind of talk, and explains the role of expert support in facilitating it.”

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OCECD (2015)
“Brian with Ministry officials co-ordinated a NZ team to write a series of reports about the LCN strategy for this book. The NZ team also attended a series of meetings at OECD headquarters in Paris to understand the thinking behind innovative strategies in Canada, French Belgium, NZ, Peru and South Africa. Read the book and see where your thinking about innovative learning environments fits with the OECD take on education developments around the globe.”

OECD (2015).  Schooling Redesigned: Towards Innovative Learning Systems, Educational Research and Innovation. Centre for Educational Research and Innovation. OECD Publishing, Paris.

“Innovation and creativity are the lifeblood of learning. Schooling Redesigned summarises beautifully one of the OECD’s most fascinating projects – an attempt to look at the DNA of innovation in schools. Using a global range of actual examples [including Learning and Change Networks in New Zealand] it describes the conditions that education systems have to create if children and their parents, teachers and communities are to feel confident and optimistic about the future. For teachers, the messages are inspiring. Education systems have to focus on enhancing teachers’ capacity and motivation. Standardisation cannot do that. Its messages to the profession and its organisations are profound.”  (Professor Michael Schratz, Dean, School of Education, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

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McKibben, S. (2014)  Leading lateral learning: learning and change networks and the social side of school reform. Fullbright New Zealand report

“Strengthen the role of facilitators in provoking challenging conversations around research relevant to LCN activities. One of the clearest takeaways from the year’s research is that LCNs need ongoing facilitation. The nature of that facilitation will change as networks mature, but there will always be a role for a facilitator to bring new research to the table, to ask for evidence, and to cross-pollinate promising strategies and tools between networks.”

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Patterson, R (2014) No School is an Island: Fostering Collaboration in a Competitive System The New Zealand Initiative.

[This publication] is the story of ‘Learning and Change Networks’ (LCN), a model of school collaboration that the government’s ‘Investing in Educational Success’ (IES) policy must learn from. The Initiative profiles the key features of LCN that enable schools to work together, and provides thinking on how to improve the IES policy to ensure the investment is worthwhile.” (Rose Patterson, The New Zealand Initiative)

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Annan, J., Annan, B., Wootton, M., & Burton, R, (2014). Facilitated Lateral Learning Networks Seminar Series 237, Centre for Strategic Education. September. Melbourne.

“This article discusses an ecological, networked approach to growing future-focused learning environments for students whose life trajectories will differ significantly from those of previous generations. Some students now have access to massive amounts of information… and they are making learning connections across multiple sites. For others, the creation of learning connections poses a greater challenge. If educational opportunity is to be available to all children, innovative new-world learning environments will need to be manufactured.  The authors suggest the facilitation of Lateral Learning Networks to make that happen. Five related ideas underpin the facilitation approach promoted by the authors to establish and operate lateral learning networks; ecological and interactive perspectives on learning, appreciation, innovation, multi-levelled social learning connections and the recognition of cultural identities”. (Dr Jean Annan, Positively Psychology, Auckland New Zealand)